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Notice for Chinese Refugees Issued By The Nanjing Safety Zone Committee

14 December 1937: Important Notice to the Refugees in the Safety Zone

  1. From now on people should stay off the streets as much as possible.
  2. At the most dangerous moment, everyone should get in houses or out of sight.
  3. The Safety Zone is for Refugees. Sorry, the Safety Zone has no power to give protection to soldiers.
  4. If there is any searching or inspection, give full freedom for such search. No opposition at all. 1

Citations

  • 1 : John Rabe, The Good Man of Nanking: The Diaries of John Rabe, trans. John E. Woods (New York: Vintage Books, 1998), 267–68.

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