Notice: Due to the COVID-19 outbreak, Facing History and Ourselves library service has been impacted. The Facing History lending library is currently unable to fulfill orders. We are very sorry for the inconvenience. We look forward to restoring service as soon as we are safely able to do so.

In the meantime, we have a lot of great digital content and hundreds of streaming educational videos. Please email us at [email protected] if you need recommendations for specific material.

War Photographer

DVD

97 minutes
Source: First Run/Icarus Films

This film follows the career of award-winning war photographer James Nachtwey from Nicaragua to Rwanda to Bosnia. Much of this documentary was filmed with a tiny video camera attached to Nachtwey's still camera, recording scenes of war and strife as he sees them. For over twenty years, he did not miss documenting a single war, and has probably seen more suffering and dying than anyone else alive. In this film, Nachtwey talks about how his work has shaped his personal life and views about war. The important role of journalists and photographers is also touched upon.

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Laser-engraved headstones show images of Bosnian Serb soldiers who were killed during the war. The cemetery is in Visegrad, in eastern Bosnia, a town where some 2,000 Muslim men and boys were killed by Serbs in the spring of 1992. Eight years after the end of the war, the former Muslim-majority town remains overwhelmingly Serb.

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Legendary Jumper

One of Mostar’s legendary jumpers throws himself from the town’s famed bridge, which stands more than 80 feet high. Eleven years after the bridge was destroyed during the 1992–1995 war, the rebuilt structure was opened to the public following a ceremony that drew many foreign officials, including Prince Charles.

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