Miriam Korber's Diary Entry on Life in Transnistria, December 26, 1941

Entry from the diary of Miriam Korber from December 26, 1941, in which she records the misery surrounding her in Transnistria during the Holocaust.


Friday, December 26, 1941

[. . .] Will we be able to survive these times? Everyone asks himself this question including me. We  have the strength to get over this hardship? We manage to eat somehow, and still, everyone looks bad. Last night the north wind started to blow. A true Ukrainian north wind, the wind of the steppe; it blows into our room. It roars in squalls and we feel the gusts of wind here on the hill so much that you think that the house is being lifted up in the air. And it gets ever colder. And still, supposedly it can get even colder here. It is said that the blizzard can block the roads and the water can freeze at the pump. This morning I went for water with Sisi. I came back crying. The bitter cold had numbed my right hand, I could feel a tightness around my heart, and I almost fell down three times on the way. And in such weather Bondy went again to Morava. Poor guy, just to make a few rubles. What times we live in! Dad is nervous, Mom is nervous, we don’t make any money and the money we have is just disappearing; we do have something to eat, we are used to eating better than others perhaps. Dad cannot get used to the “laziness” of doing nothing all day so he consumes his energy by quarreling with us. We are on each other’s nerves only because there is nothing to keep us busy. It is two in the afternoon. It is cold in the room and I don’t know how we will resist till evening without a fire. Firewood is so expensive. I can see on everyone’s faces the fear of tomorrow. What will happen? How will we live when we run out of money? There are good rumors from the battlefront. Perhaps salvation is closing in.1

Source

[1] Alexandra Zapruder, ed., Salvaged Pages: Young Writers' Diaries of the Holocaust, 2nd edition (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2015) 254–255.
Topic:
Holocaust
Place:
Ukraine

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