Photo of Martin Luther King, Jr. marching arm in arm with a crowd of men participating in the  1968 Memphis Sanitation Worker's Strike.
Mini-Unit

Memphis 1968

Lessons and resources help you explore the sanitation workers’ strike and other events that brought Dr. King to Memphis in the spring of 1968. This lesson is part of our partnership with the National Civil Rights Museum's MLK50 initiative. 

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At a Glance

Mini-Unit

Language

English — US

Subject

  • History
  • Social Studies

Grade

9–12

Duration

One week
  • Democracy & Civic Engagement
  • Human & Civil Rights

Overview

About This Mini-Unit

The life and legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. remains relevant 50 years after his assassination in 1968. The lessons and resources below help educators and community members explore the issues that Dr. King raised in Memphis and ask the question, "What is the role of civic engagement in a healthy democracy?"

What is the role of civic engagement in a healthy democracy?

This collection supports a one week exploration of the issues that Dr. King raised in Memphis in 1968. It includes:

  • 3 lessons 
  • 5 readings 
  • 1 video 
  • 1 audio 
  • 2 handouts
  • 14 activities

The National Civil Rights Museum, located at the historic Lorraine Motel, recognizes that the 50th anniversary of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s assassination demands a significant commemoration. The museum, in conjunction with partner organizations and civil rights leaders across the country, will structure its events and activities to encourage others to continue the Civil Rights Movement while focusing on the theme, “MLK50 - Where Do We Go From Here.”

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