Paragraph 175

DVD

81 minutes, German with English subtitles
Source: Telling Pictures

Between 1933 and 1945, according to Nazi documents, approximately 100,000 men were arrested for homosexuality. Roughly half were sentenced to prison and approximately 10,000 to 15,000 were incarcerated in concentration camps. The death rate of homosexual prisoners in the camps is estimated to be as high as 60 percent, so that by 1945 only about 4,000 survived. The fact that gay men were imprisoned in concentration camps and branded with a pink triangle is becoming common knowledge. What is less well-known is that many gay survivors were subjected to ongoing persecutions in post-Nazi Germany, where they were seen not as political prisoners but as criminals under the Nazi sodomy law, which remained on the books until 1969. Featuring the personal stories of homosexual men who experienced persecution under the Nazis, this film fills a crucial gap in the historical record of the Holocaust and post-Nazi Germany.

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