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Nicholas Winton: The Power of Good

DVD

64 minutes
Source: Out of print

A documentary about the courage, determination, and modesty of a young English stock exchange clerk who saved the lives of 669 Jewish children who otherwise almost certainly would have been murdered by the Nazis. Between March and August 1939, Nicholas Winton organized six trains to take children from Prague to new Jewish homes in Britain, and kept quiet about it until his wife discovered a scrapbook documenting his unique mission in 1988.

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