Fostering Civil Discourse (South Africa version)

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Fostering Civil Discourse (South Africa version)

How can you create a safe and reflective classroom where students learn to exchange ideas and listen respectfully to each other? What strategies are most effective in helping students practice constructive civil discourse? 

In the midst of protests in South African schools over race and inclusion; ongoing protests on university campuses around fees and belonging; and a series of tragic acts of violence around the world, educators are rightly concerned about the lessons that today’s learners might be absorbing about problem solving, communication, civility, and their ability to make a difference. The next generation of South African voters needs models for constructive public discourse to learn from; the strength of our democracy requires it. But such examples seem few and far between.

This guide provides strategies designed to help you navigate these challenging times and support your students to develop effective skills for participation in the classroom and the wider community.

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Fostering Civil Discourse: How Do We Talk About Issues That Matter?

The ideas and tools in this guide will help you prepare students to engage in reflective conversations on topics that matter, whether you are in a remote, hybrid, or in-person setting.

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