Unit Assessment

From Identity to Action

From the Unit:

Assessment Overview

The following assessment ideas for each section of this scheme of work provide opportunities for students to complete creative, collaborative projects that reinforce the concepts and skills they have learned over their course of study. Teachers should modify the projects as necessary to fit the specific time demands and needs of their classes. Consult our teaching strategies page for additional ways to structure collaborative learning experiences for your students. Each assessment project also includes one or more ideas for how your students might share their learning with other members of the school community.

Step 1:

The Individual and Society

Students will have the opportunity to define themselves visually in this mask-making project. Drawing from their identity charts and journal reflections in the first four lessons, they will select aspects of their identities to highlight on the front of their masks as well as aspects that are often hidden or unknown by others to represent on the back. Sharing their masks with their classmates provides a way for students to celebrate what makes them unique, counter the “single stories” others may have of them, and create a sense of community in which individuals are known beyond superficial labels and assumptions.

Note to Teacher: To prepare for this assessment, you might explain it to students in class and then allow them to collect photographs and images at home that they would like to add to their masks. You will need to provide materials for mask making, including (but not limited to): paper plates, large pieces of paper, coloured paper, glue, scissors, marker pens, magazines.

  • Start the project by asking students to review their identity charts and journal entries from this scheme of work. Ask them to identify parts of their identities that everyone knows about, as well as parts that many or most people might not know about.
  • Then ask them to respond to the following question in their journals:

    Why are some parts of our identities more visible than others? What role do our own choices play in determining what other people know about our identities and what they do not? What other factors play a role?

  • Explain to students that they will be creating masks that represent the aspects of themselves that they show to the outside world and the aspects that others do not often see. Have students brainstorm ideas for their masks by completing the Mask-Making Preparation Worksheet.
  • Show students the materials they can use for their masks. Inform students that they can decorate both the outside and the inside of the masks. They can use the outside to represent the aspects of their identities they openly show to the outside world and the inside to represent the more private aspects of their identities.
  • Have students share their masks in a gallery walk or presentation and then respond to the following questions on a class graffitti board: Who am I? Who are we?
Step 2:

We and They

For their second project, students will work in groups to create short illustrated children’s stories in which their main characters deal with issues of conformity and belonging.

  • First, have groups identify their target audience, brainstorm ideas for their story, and then develop one or more characters and the setting.
  • Then ask groups to think about the central conflict of their story. You might ask them to consider why their protagonist struggles with identity and belonging by exploring the possible causes of tension—a desire to fit in, external forces like peer pressure, being reduced to a “single story” by others, “in” and “out” groups—and the consequences of these feelings.
  • Engage the students in pre-writing activities, such as creating an identity chart for their protagonist and any other minor, but significant characters, discussing how the protagonist views themself and how others view the protagonist. You might also have the students write a journal in response to a question about group membership from the point of view of one or more characters.
  • Next, have groups outline their stories using a storyboard template. While you might choose to end the project here, groups might also take it one step further and “publish” their stories in a Powerpoint presentation or in a book format. If you teach at a school with younger children, your students might share their stories in a cross-age celebration of learning.
Step 3:

Understanding Human Rights

For their third project, students will work in groups to come to consensus on 10 fundamental human rights that they feel every individual, student and adult, in their school is entitled to enjoy and then create a School Declaration of Human Rights Infographic to convey this message using text and visuals.

  • First ask students to reflect on the following passage from Eleanor Roosevelt’s speech “Where Do Human Rights Begin?”

    . . . in small places, close to home—so close and so small that they cannot be seen on any map of the world. Yet they are the world of the individual person: The neighbourhood he lives in; the school or college he attends; the factory, farm, or office where he works. Such are the places where every man, woman, and child seeks equal justice, equal opportunity, equal dignity without discrimination. Unless these rights have meaning there, they have little meaning anywhere. Without concerted citizen action to uphold them close to home, we shall look in vain for progress in the larger world."1

    You might ask them to underline three phrases that stand out to them for their reflection or have them reflect on the passage as a whole.
  • Then have students share their responses with classmates, using the Think, Pair, Share, Concentric Circles, or Save the Last Word for Me teaching strategies.
  • Divide the class into groups and explain to them that they will be creating a School Declaration of Human Rights Infographic that, if adopted and followed, would help ensure that their school is a “place where every man, woman, and child seeks equal justice, equal opportunity, and equal dignity without discrimination.”
  • Instruct the groups to first come to consensus on ten rights that they feel every person in the school community—students, departments, staff—are entitled to and then have them present them on a poster, which they might create on large paper or on a computer. They should think about how to use text, images, colour, and spacing to convey their ideas.
  • Then have groups create a proposal for how they might share this information with the school administration, staff, and students in order to seek buy in. You might also ask them to consider what the process of seeking justice might look like for a community member who feels that one or more of their rights has been violated.
  • Finally, each group will present their infographic and process for seeking justice. The class will either vote or seek consensus to choose one School UDHR to present to the administration.

Citations

  • 1 : Eleanor Roosevelt, “Where Do Human Rights Begin?,” in Courage in a Dangerous World: The Political Writings of Eleanor Roosevelt, ed. Allida M. Black (New York: Columbia University Press, 1999), 190.

Step 4:

Choosing to Participate

The fourth and final project provides students with the opportunity to choose a question, issue, or theme from this scheme of work to explore in depth with a partner or in a group and then present to the class or larger school community. For this project, you might ask students to focus on their school community, neighbourhood, borough, or allow each pair or group to choose the scope of their project.

  • At the outset of the project, give students time to quietly review their journals, readings, and notes from this scheme of work. Then in their journals, ask students to brainstorm a list of questions, issues, or themes that they feel passionate about and would like to explore in greater depth.
  • First in groups and then as a class, have students share their areas of interest. Topics might include (but not be limited to) navigating multi-faceted identities; confronting stereotyping and bullying at school; creating safe inclusive spaces at school and in the local community; calling attention to biases or “single stories” in the curriculum; exploring human rights violations in their community; learning about the role of women at the Battle of Cable Street or at another moment in British history; applying the “levers of power” to an injustice or unfairness they would like to address; or researching one or more local murals to understand the process by which it came to be, its central message, and its artist.
  • As students share their ideas, record their ideas on the board or flipchart paper.
  • Then help the students form pairs and small groups based on their areas of interest and explain how you would like them to learn more about their chosen topic (online research, library research, interviews, documentary films, museum visits or neighbourhood walking tours, etc.).
  • After they have completed their research, consider using the “levers of power” or introduce Danielle Allen’s questions for civil participation in the reading Online Civic Participation and instruct students to create an action plan for how they might call attention to their issue and lead a change effort in their school, community, or world.
  • Explain to students that for the final step of the project, they will decide how to convey their information to a larger audience. While you might have your own ideas for the finished project, one possibility is they might include some or all of the following elements:

    • A brief statement about the issue, why it matters, and who it impacts
    • Key findings from their research
    • Strategies for how to access one or more “levers of power” or answers to Danielle Allen’s questions for civil participation
    • A statement of their plan of action and desired outcome
  • Finally, have students decide how they would like to convey their learning in a class or school-wide celebration (e.g. mini exhibition, proposal for a mural, video documentary, podcast, or blog post). Through their presentation, each pair or group should explain why this issue resonates with them and their communities and include an action plan to raise awareness and inspire change.

Unit

Introduction

Get Prepared to Teach This Scheme of Work in Your Classroom

Prepare yourself to teach this unit by reading about our pedagogy, teaching strategies, and the unit's structure.

Lesson 1 of 15
Democracy & Civic Engagement

Understanding Identity

Students consider the question "Who am I?" and identify social and cultural factors that shape identity by reading a short story and creating personal identity charts.

Lesson 2 of 15
Democracy & Civic Engagement

Transcending Single Stories

Students reflect on how stereotypes and "single stories" influence our identities, how we view others, and the choices we make.

Lesson 3 of 15
Democracy & Civic Engagement

Why Little Things Are Big

Students reflect on the power of being labelled and use Jesús Colón’s essay to reflect on their own experiences of being misjudged.

Lesson 4 of 15
Democracy & Civic Engagement

The Challenge of Confirmation Bias

Students define confirmation bias and examine why people sometimes maintain their beliefs in the face of information that contradicts their understanding.

Assessment

Topic

Democracy & Civic Engagement
Step 1:

The Individual and Society

Students explore their identities through a mask-making project.

Lesson 5 of 15
Democracy & Civic Engagement

The Costs and Benefits of Belonging

Students learn about group membership and explore the range of responses available to us when we encounter exclusion, discrimination, and injustice.

Lesson 6 of 15
Democracy & Civic Engagement

Responding to Difference

Students explore a poem by James Berry about the ways we respond to difference and complete a creative assignment about their school or community.

Lesson 7 of 15
Democracy & Civic Engagement

When Differences Matter

Students consider what happens when one aspect of our identity is privileged above others by society.

Lesson 8 of 15
Democracy & Civic Engagement

Blending In and Standing Out

Students use an excerpt from Sarfraz Manzoor memoir to reflect on identity, belonging, and wanting to feel invisible.

Lesson 9 of 15
Democracy & Civic Engagement

Defining Our Obligations to Others

Students are introduced to the concept of universe of obligation to better understand how societies create "in" groups and "out" groups.

Assessment

Topic

Democracy & Civic Engagement
Step 2:

We and They

Students work collaboratively to create illustrated children’s stories that explore issues of conformity and belonging.

Lesson 10 of 15
Democracy & Civic Engagement

Defining Human Rights

Students create a definition for a "right" in order to explore the challenges faced by the UN Commission on Human Rights to create an international framework of rights for all human beings.

Lesson 11 of 15
Democracy & Civic Engagement

Making Rights Universal

Students analyse four rights in the UDHR and decide whether they are universal and enjoyed by all in the world today.

Assessment

Topic

Democracy & Civic Engagement
Step 3:

Understanding Human Rights

Students work collaboratively to create a School Declaration of Human Rights Infographic.

Lesson 12 of 15
Democracy & Civic Engagement

Standing Up to Hatred on Cable Street

Students study the Battle of Cable Street in London by examining testimonies of individuals who demonstrated against fascist leader Oswald Mosley.

Lesson 13 of 15
Democracy & Civic Engagement

Public Art as a Form of Participation

Students analyse the Battle of Cable Street Mural and reflect on the role of public art to commemorate, educate, and build community.

Lesson 14 of 15
Democracy & Civic Engagement

Protesting Discrimination in Bristol

Students use the historical case study of the Bristol Bus Boycott to examine strategies for bringing about change in our communities.

Lesson 15 of 15
Democracy & Civic Engagement

Speaking Up and Speaking Out

Students analyse a spoken word poem about bullying and consider how they might use their voices to call attention to injustice in their schools or communities.

Final Assessment

Topic

Democracy & Civic Engagement
Step 4:

Choosing to Participate

Students have an opportunity to explore one issue in-depth and to create an action plan that inspires change in their schools or communities.

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