Glenn Ligon's Untitled: Four Etchings | Facing History & Ourselves
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Glenn Ligon's Untitled: Four Etchings

Artist Glenn Ligon created Untitled: Four Etchings using quotations from writer Zora Neale Hurston's essay, "How It Feels to Be Colored Me" and Ralph Ellison's novel Invisible Man.

Subject

  • Civics & Citizenship
  • History
  • Social Studies

Language

English — US

Updated

Glenn Ligon, Four Etchings [A]

In this white on black etching, Glenn Ligon repeats "I do not always feel colored," a phrase from Zora Neale Hurston's essay "How It Feels to Be Colored Me."

Credit:
Glenn Ligon/Reproduced with permission from Thomas Dane Gallery

Glenn Ligon, Four Etchings [A]

This black-on-white etching quotes Zora Neale Hurston's essay "How It Feels to be Colored Me."

Credit:
Glenn Ligon/Reproduced with permission from Thomas Dane Gallery

Glenn Ligon, Untitled - Four Etchings [C]

In this black-on-black etching, Glenn Ligon uses Ralph Ellison's quote from the prologue of his novel, Invisible Man (1952): "I am an invisible man. No, I am not a spook like those who haunted Edgar Allan Poe; nor am I one of your Hollywood-movie ectoplasms. I am a man of substance, of flesh and bone, fiber and liquids—and I might even be said to possess a mind. I am invisible, understand, simply because people refuse to see me. Like the bodiless heads you see sometimes in circus side-shows, it is as though I have been surrounded by mirrors of hard, distorting glass. When they approach me they see only themselves, or figments of their imagina-"

Credit:
Glenn Ligon/Reproduced with permission from Thomas Dane Gallery

Glenn Ligon, Untitled - Four Etchings [D]

In this second black-on-black etching, Glenn Ligon also uses Ralph Ellison's quote from the prologue of his novel, Invisible Man (1952), though this one uses the complete quote, which ends "...figments of their imagination-indeed everything."

Credit:
Glenn Ligon/Reproduced with permission from Thomas Dane Gallery

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