What Do We Learn From the News?: How Reporters’ Choices Shape our Understanding of the World

To deepen students’ understanding of key themes in the film, ten supplementary readings have been included in the study guide. Readings are organized into four investigations that correspond to specific excerpts and themes in the film. Each investigation includes an overview that frames the readings. Readings are following by a series of connections that can be used to frame discussions and writing assignments.

Should Reporters Advocate?: Exploring the Role of Journalists

To deepen students’ understanding of key themes in the film, ten supplementary readings have been included in the study guide. Readings are organized into four investigationsthat correspond to specific excerpts and themes in the film. Each investigation includes an overview that frames the readings. Readings are following by a series of connections that can be used to frame discussions and writing assignments.

Why Don't People Act?: Confronting Psychic Numbing

To deepen students’ understanding of key themes in the film, ten supplementary readings have been included in the study guide. Readings are organized into four investigations that correspond to specific excerpts and themes in the film. Each investigation includes an overview that frames the readings. Readings are following by a series of connections that can be used to frame discussions and writing assignments.

Viewing REPORTER

Some teachers will show the entire 90-minute documentary, while others will show selected clips. Reviewing the Investigation Overviews can help you select excerpts that are most appropriate, given your learning objectives. The following activities have been suggested because they help students comprehend and engage with the material in the film, and they also hold students accountable for paying attention.

Lesson Ideas for REPORTER

How do you get people to care about injustice and poverty? How do you get them to act? Who is responsible for addressing humanitarian problems occurring around the world? The 90-minute documentary Reporter follows New York Times columnist Nicholas Kristof on a trip to central Africa as he grapples with these questions and others. These lesson ideas were developed to support the use of this film in the classroom.

Connections for Investigation Four

1. Make an identity chart for Leana Wen.  What do you know about her? How do you think her identity has shaped her goal “to solve global problems by educating and motivating the public to action”?  How has your identity shaped your beliefs about civic participation—about being involved in your community (local, national, or global)?

2. Wen’s first suggestion is to “educate yourself.” What do you want to know more about, in terms of problems facing communities near or far? Where might you look to find this information?

"Jewish Journal" Features Facing History Workshop at UCLA

The Jewish Journal has previewed Facing History and Ourselves' upcoming educator workshop for the Jewish Refugees in Shanghai (1933-1941) exhibition, on display at UCLA. The exhibit tells the story of the 20,000 Jewish refugees who found safe refuge in Shanghai from 1933-1941. The workshop will focus on how teachers can use personal narratives by rescuers and survivors as a way to bring this history into their classrooms.

Investigation Four: What Can We Do to Help? Education and Action

The reading in this investigation has been selected to deepen our understanding of ideas presented in the documentary Reporter. As we follow Nicholas Kristof through eastern Congo, we are confronted with many of the problems—including poverty, lack of medical care, and violence—endured by the women, children, and men living in the region.

Read the full overview for Investigation Four.

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